Fight My Pick My Wager
– VS – Forrest Griffin 

Judge’s decision

Unanimous/majority decision

[none]
Forrest Griffin Rich “Ace” Franklin
– VS – Anderson Silva 

Fight ends in round 3

KO / TKO

[none]
Anderson “The Spider” Silva Vitor “The Phenom” Belfort
– VS – Jon Jones 

Fight ends in round 1

KO / TKO

[none]
Ryan Bader
[Underdog]
Jon Jones
– VS – Miguel Torres 

Judge’s decision

Unanimous/majority decision

[none]
Antonio Banuelos
[Underdog]
Miguel Torres
– VS – Jake Ellenberger 

Judge’s decision

Unanimous/majority decision

[none]
Carlos Eduardo “Ta Danado” Rocha
[Underdog]
Jake Ellenberger
HOT 

– VS –

BOUT

Kyle Kingsbury 

Fight ends in round 2

Submission / Tapout

[none]
Ricardo Romero Kyle Kingsbury
– VS – Mike Pierce 

Fight ends in round 3

KO / TKO

[none]
Kenny Robertson Mike Pierce
– VS – Norifumi Yamamoto 

Judge’s decision

Unanimous/majority decision

[none]
Norifumi “Kid” Yamamoto Demetrious “Mighty Mouse” Johnson
– VS – Chad Mendes 

Fight ends in round 3

Submission / Tapout

[none]
Chad “Money” Mendes Michihiro Omigawa
– VS – Gabe Ruediger 

Judge’s decision

Unanimous/majority decision

[none]
Gabe Ruediger Paul Taylor
– VS – Donald Cerrone 

Judge’s decision

Unanimous/majority decision

[none]
Paul Kelly
[Underdog]
Donald “Cowboy” Cerrone


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The Path of the Righteous

Posted: January 26, 2011 in manliness

At times I find myself enthralled in the glory that is the freedom to express oneself and become a man custom built by his actions and experiences. A life free to be sculpted by the hands of the very individual living out those days is truly a thing of no small magnitude or beauty. It is that very freedom that has allowed me to make the many mistakes in my life, and has also allowed me to do the things of which I am most proud. I feel compelled to exercise the aforementioned freedom to put ink to paper, so to speak, and chronicle how to be not just another American male but an American man. Manliness is not achieved simply through the fortune of being birthed with more than one rope hanging from a disgusting, muck covered torso but in behavior and interactions with others throughout life. I like to think of American manliness not confined within set guidelines but more so as a definition of character based upon few core standards, allowing for each man to be unique. Courage, kindness, respect, loyalty, and charity are the common denominators, fellows.

American standards have a way of asking men in our culture to be lovers, protectors, providers, and even heroes. Regardless of profession every man can be a hero to someone. Heroism does not have to be measured in deeds of great peril but the term can be bestowed upon those who lead by example. A man should not come home from work upset daily, but rather proud of his day’s accomplishments and the work that he has done. When one loves what he does he truly has not had to work. When a man hates his job he will come home angry and his children will see this and emulate it. Unfortunate as it may be this has become the cycle of America. The first step in being manly is having the courage to do what is right, to do what must be done, or even the courage to chase a dream. If a man loves singing and writing music, then there is nothing that should stop that man but himself. This is America, my friends, and it is here for the taking. It is not the timid or the weak of will that grab opportunity by the short and curlies but the strong minded men that made this country great who succeed. Looking up at his father a small boy sees that fire in his eyes, that passion driving him to do what he loves, and that small boy respects and loves his father to no end. A father should always be at least one person’s hero. That, ladies and gentlemen, is a manly quality. Nothing should make a man feel greater than the respect and admiration of his family and friends.

Aside from being courageous in life, a man must also be tactful and willing to respect those whom he expects respect from in return. Being a good man is a much more difficult undertaking than many wish to burden themselves with. I charge my fellow men with the next step in American manliness, the balance of humility and pride. Some interpret the Holy Bible as stating that the opposite of humility is pride and that pride is negative. I maintain that pride, like most other characteristics, must be in moderation. Pride bordering on arrogance is distasteful it is by no means a manly quality. A man must discern the differences in pride and arrogance as well as recognize and understand when it is time to be humble. An arrogant man is a foolish man, but a man who takes no pride in himself is little if at all better off. Too humble and a man is seen as weak or even, oddly enough, arrogant. Too arrogant and a man is seen as pompous and quite frankly, as an ass. In the fact that no one wishes to be seen in either light we, as men, must achieve a balance in our character.

Character, gentlemen, is what makes a man after all. A wise man once said that a man should not be judged by his outward appearance but by the content of his character. Charity to those who need it, respect for those deserving, kindness to even his enemies, loyalty to whom or what he loves, and the courage to stand for it all, that is what makes an American man.

flag-l

Dynamite!! 2009 Was an insanely awesome card and culminated with Aoki snapping Hirota’s humerus in half…

ept_sports_mma_experts-797868878-1262321045

the best part is that Aoki was Dream’s lightweight champ and Hirota was Sengoku’s lightweight champ. Just the idea of the two promotions coming together for such a monumental card is astounding.  There was a SRC HW title fight, a Dream HW fight, the finale for the Dream Super Hulk (open weight) Grand Prix, and several K-1 bouts but the fights between Dream and Sengoku’s guys alone would make up a robust and sizeable card.

  • LW bout: Aoki (Dream LW champ) vs. Hirota (SRC LW champ)
  • HW bout: Overeem vs. Fujita
  • FW bout: “Kid” Yamamoto vs. Kanehara (SRC FW champ)
  • LW bout: Kawajiri vs. Yokota
  • FW bout: Tokoro vs. Man Kim
  • MW bout: Manhoef vs. Misaki
  • WW bout: Sakurai vs. Gono
  • FW bout: Takaya vs. Omigawa
  • HW bout: Shibata vs. Izumi

Please, step into my FANTASY world where time and contracts and money mean nothing. The only thing that matters is the fans getting to see what they want. Let’s put together a PPV card worth $100, the greatest MMA card ever held.

Season’s Beatings 2011

Saturday December 24th 2011 at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas

The UFC and Strikeforce execs have signed off to put a card together and each has agreed to send at least two champions each to the face-off. We have been asked to help assemble this card and as such I’ll get the conversation started. I’ll throw some names into the hat from each division of each promotion and list the champions from all the divisions. We’ll try to get 11 bouts. Nine UFC vs. Strikeforce (7 bouts with non title holders 2 bouts UFC Champ vs. SF Champ)bouts,  a title bout or super fight(i.e. Silva vs. GSP) for the UFC, and a Strikeforce title match or big ticket fight (i.e. Jason Miller vs. Nick Diaz), maybe the HW GP Final. I have left off the Featherweight and Bantamweight divisions of the UFC since Strikeforce doesn’t have those divisions. However, either division could be the division the UFC uses for a title fight. Let’s take a look at some of the guys listed here and start the debate… I’ll add some of your good cards to the post as well.

UFC

Champs

ufc-belt

  • Heavyweight – Cain Velasquez
  • Light-Heavyweight – Mauricio Rua
  • Middleweight – Anderson Silva
  • Welterweight – Georges St. Pierre
  • Lightweight – Frankie Edgar
  • Featherweight – Jose Aldo
  • Bantamweight – Dominic Cruz

Heavyweights

  • Junior dos Santos
  • Roy Nelson
  • Brock Lesnar
  • Shane Carwin
  • Frank Mir
  • Big Nog’

Light-Heavyweights

  • Rashad Evans
  • Rampage Jackson
  • Jon Jones
  • Lyoto Machida
  • Ryan Bader
  • Lil’ Nog’

Middleweights

  • Chael Sonnen
  • Michael Bisping
  • Chris Leben
  • Wanderlei Silva
  • Yushin Okami
  • Nate Marquardt

Welterweights

  • Josh Koscheck
  • Jon Fitch
  • Thiago Alves
  • Dan Hardy
  • BJ Penn
  • Diego Sanchez

Lightweights

  • Gray Maynard
  • Kenny Florian
  • BJ Penn
  • George Sotiropoulos
  • Jeremy Stephens
  • Clay Guida

Strikeforce

Champs

Strikeforce Belt

  • Heavyweight – Alistair Overeem
  • Light-heavyweight – Rafael Calvacante
  • Middleweight – Ronaldo Souza
  • Welterweight – Nick Diaz
  • Lightweight – Gilbert Melendez

Heavyweights

  • Fedor Emelianenko
  • Fabricio Werdum
  • Antonio Silva
  • Andrei Arlovski
  • Sergei Kharitonov
  • Brett Rogers

Light-Heavyweights

  • Dan Henderson
  • Gegard Mousasi
  • Muhammed Lawal
  • Renato Sobral
  • Roger Gracie

Middleweights

  • Cung Le
  • Jason Miller
  • Tim Kennedy

Welterweights

  • Paul Daley
  • Marius Zaromskis
  • Scott Smith
  • KJ Noons
  • ….

Lightweights

  • JZ Calvan
  • KJ Noons
  • (if they can get off their ass and pull him up) Eddie Alvarez
  • Lyle Beerbohm
  • Billy Evangelista
  • Justin Wilcox
  • Ryan “The Natural Light” Couture

Manly Men of the Motoring World

Posted: January 12, 2011 in cars, life, manliness, sports

Rather you drive a Fusion to and from work, have spent countless man hours in the garage turning wrenches on your own beater Civic, or own a 430 Modena you undoubtedly have heard of these men, or at least their contributions to the world of automobiles or even the world in general. Listed here in no particular order are seven men that have forever stamped their respective marks on society to be seen and felt by billions the world over even today. Of course I could sit here and list hundreds of men whom people in Japan wouldn’t much know or care about and the same goes for Europe and America. I have instead opted to be far more broad in naming these few brilliant bastards. These seven names alone are so engrained your everyday life that they are, in some cases, hardly noticed.

 

112_0808_10z enzo_ferrari portrait

Enzo Ferrari led anything but a trite 90 years. From WWI service in the Italian 3rd Alpine Artillery Division and loss of his immediate family during the Italian flu pandemic to the founding of Scuderia Ferrari and his continued pursuit of racing dominance his life was hardly a common experience. It has been maintained by many that Ferrari, by his own admission, purposefully overcharged for his cars solely to perpetuate his obsession with racing. His entire life, post war, can be traced back to that obsession. Racing was Ferrari and for many of his days Ferrari was racing. Citing many issues with Alfa Romeo in the 30s Enzo eventually left the company to, pursue his own ventures. During WWII his small parts company was relegated to war production, however following the war he quickly disrobed himself of the fascist cloak bestowed upon him by that relegation. In 1947 Enzo founded the manufacturing company we know and love today, the one baring his own name, Ferrari. The famous Prancing Horse badge that had been emblazoned on the fuselage of top Italian fighter pilot Francesco Baracca during WWI, given to Ferrari by Baracca’s mother, would now be proudly placed on the hood of his automobiles. The Ferrari name is now known the world over for opulence, speed, power, and elegance. Scuderia Ferrari became infinitely more successful since the founding of the Ferrari manufacturing company and has won in Formula 1 racing 16 Constructor’s Championships and 15 Driver’s Championships. Enzo Ferrari also indirectly contributed to the creation of, arguably, the greatest American racing car of all time in the Ford GT40. When financial woes hit in the early 60s, Enzo offered to sell Ferrari to Ford for $18 Million in 1963 (approx. $124,779,170 today) but withdrew the offer late. This sparked the desire within Henry Ford II to beat Ferrari at le Mans, a feat accomplished 4 straight years that decade with the Ford GT40. Racing is still as big a part of the company Ferrari as it ever was for the man himself. Some 14 years after his 1988 death his full name was mated to the Enzo Ferrari, a car designed for the company’s 55th anniversary.

Manliness Resume

  • Armed service is a manly undertaking. In WWI he helped defend his homeland in the Alps despite being underequipped and understaffed.
  • Rose to greatness as a “self taught” man.
  • Helped drive auto racing to new heights as a driver, manufacturer, and as an owner.
  • Designed some of the most beautiful and awe inspiring machines to ever grace the roads of the world.  A tradition his company has continued after his death.
  • A man of great self motivation and competitive drive.
  • Inducted to the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1994.
  • Look at that quote. It’s like he wrote the mantra for American muscle cars!

 

 carroll_shelby_3_cobras

Carroll Shelby could be used to define Americana in ways. Born in rural east Texas with heart problems that plagued him in to post-pubescence  in during the roaring twenties and coming of age during the great depression, Shelby undoubtedly knows the value of hard work. In 1940 he enlisted in the US Army Air Corps (precursor to the US Air Force) and served in WWII as a flight instructor and as a test pilot. From his Willys in high school to testing out P51 mustangs to racing for Aston Martin and Maserati to building iconic Mustangs of his own Carroll Shelby has led a dream life for any gear(petrol)head. Carroll Shelby has helped produce many of America’s greatest contributions to the world of motoring. With a hand in making the Ford GT40, Shelby GT500, Dodge Viper, and the 427 Shelby Cobra he has indeed set himself apart from the herd in the world of tuning. He brought the AC Motors roadster over from Britain and made it an American Icon by stuffing a “massive engine in a tiny, lightweight car”. That very ideal has been the modus operandi for super car manufacturers and tuners alike ever since. The man is not only a legend in the American automotive world but the world over. Stuffing a 7.0L V8 into a car that weighed in at 2,300 lbs. was unheard of before the 427 Cobra. Shelby is the only man on this list still alive today and while rapidly approaching 88 years of age he is still very much hands on with projects like the Ford Shelby Concept car and the Donzi Shelby 22GT speedboat. His iconic black cowboy hat is as recognizable as his trademark signature and smile. Carroll Shelby has made contributions to the racing world that have reverberated directly to the streets. With movies like Gone and 60 Seconds (and the eventual remake) his designs like “Eleanor” will live on forever, long after he passes into that special corner of heaven where they keep the holy versions Laguna Seca, le Mans, Silverstone, and the Nürburgring.

Manliness Resume

  • Served in the US Army Air Corps during WWII.
  • Helped build American cars for Ford to beat Ferrari on the world stage.
  • HE WAS AN ARMY TEST PILOT IN THE 40s!
  • Legendary tuner and hot rod enthusiast.
  • Inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1991.

 

bertha-et-karl-benz

Karl Benz gave us the automobile as we know it today. Was it the first mechanically powered means of personal transportation? Of course not. Was it the first practical means of personal transportation? Nope. Was it safe? Read the quote above. What made it better than Cugnot’s steam powered automobile in 1769 [Ed. note: Aside from Cugnot being french and crashing the first ever automobile. That’s right the first ever car crash was caused by a frenchmam.] or Richard Trevithick’s steam powered carriage in 1806 or any other numerous attempt as the modern automobile before it? Really, not much. After all there were electric cars well before the first gas powered vehicles hit the roadways. Daimler and Maybach were unknowingly working on very similar designs at the same time as Benz. In all honesty the one thing that sets his machine apart from theirs and puts Benz on the list and not Gottlieb Daimler is the simple fact that he got to the patent office first in 1886. Benz secured patents on the engine and the processes to make the internal combustion engine for his Motorwagen before the others could and thus he wins. Benz’ Motorwagen wasn’t perfect at first but by 1888 Karl Benz become the first man to design, build, and, perhaps most importantly, make an automobile commercially available to the public. the Motorwagen was a success and his business grew and grew as a result. Benz’ automobile was a novelty of sorts, a toy for the wealthy if you will. Eventually investors saw the need for an “affordable” car and Benz’ would consequently be credited with the creation of the worlds first production vehicle in the Benz Velo. He went on to create the first truck which would later be modified into the world’s first bus. Benz’ primary competition came from Daimler’s company, DMG, whom had a brilliant engineer name Emil Jellinik. Jellinik designed the engine for the Mercedes-35hp, named after Jellinik’s daughter, and Wilhelm Maybach built it before resigning from DMG. The two companies would eventually form the luxury and sports car manufacturing giant Mercedes-Benz. The rest, as they say, is history.

Manliness Resume

  • Found what he was passionate about and best at and put everything he had into it. You have to respect that.
  • Created the Boxer style engine that is still used to this day by companies like Porsche and Subaru.
  • His 1909 Blitzen Benz held the land speed record for 10 years.
  • Married a woman who herself was a pioneer in the automotive world, Bertha Benz. The man knew how to pick a bride.

 

 ferruccio_lamborghini

Ferruccio Lamborghini is proof that you don’t have to be what your parents are. He was born to grape farmers in Italy, a respected enterprise but far removed from his own. Or is it? When you hear the name Lamborghini, like most, you probably think of a raging bull breeds like Diablo, Countach, or Gallardo but that’s just the end of the story. Ferruccio began life on a farm and his tinkering didn’t start on Alfa Romeos like Enzo or Euro roadsters like Shelby but with what was around him, farming equipment. Unlike Enzo Ferrari, Lamborghini had a formal education but like his eventual rival he also served in the Italian military. Lamborghini was drafted into the Royal Italian Air Force in WWII where he became the supervisor of vehicle maintenance, but was captured by the British in ‘45 and held prisoner for a year. When he returned home to his wife, who died soon after in ‘47, he opened his first garage. He spent free moments much like the import scene guys in America do today, in his garage turning wrenches on his own car. he eventually modified his little Fiat enough to enter into the Mille Miglia but crashed out and gave up on racing. After building a new tractor for his father out of spare parts friends asked him to build one for them and so forth and so on. Eventually Lamborghini Trattori was born. The tractor business did extremely well and allowed Ferruccio to buy the expensive sports cars he coveted in his youth. Alfas, Lancias, Mercedes, Maseratis, and even Ferraris found there way into his personal collection. He wasn’t satisfied though. His Ferraris were too noisy and uncomfortable for a road car and required service too often and the Maseratis were beautiful but felt heavy and “didn’t go very fast”. After repeated repairs on his Ferraris clutches, legend has it, he installed a clutch from one of his tractors in his Ferrari (sounds like something my grandfather would do) and took it to Ferrari himself and told him, “There, I fixed your car.” The quote in his image above is in reference to Ferrari’s handling of that encounter. Lamborghini then went on to make his own cars, proper gran tourismo cars as he would tell you. Plush interior, luxury amenities, lightweight, big power, insanely fast but notoriously hard to control, basically death traps. Thank you, Ferrruccio Lamborghini. Since then his company has produced some of the most overzealous attempts at a supercar, so wild that a new term has been devised to describe them…the hypercar!

Manliness Resume

  • Armed service during WWII as a mechanic, and time spent as a POW.
  • Risen from  the poor to own every car he dreamed of until he realized even they weren’t up to his standards.
  • He “fixed” a Ferrari with his own parts and then TOLD Ferrari that he fixed it. Classic slap in the face.
  • Obsession with bullfighting led him to name several of his hypercars after bull breeds and even his friend a famous Spanish bull breeder.

So the only big promotion MMA left are the Dynamite!! 2010 and Soul of Fight cards in Japan. The cards have been fully updated on the SERDAFIED MMA Schedule page, but I’ll run through some of the names you guys should watch out for.Soul of Fight next Thursday will feature the exciting lightweight Marlon Sandro, top welterweights Kazuo Misaki and Mamed Khalidov, and the always thrilling Maximo Blanco.

Here are a few good reasons to watch Dynamite!! 2010 on HDNet next Friday (Keep in mind both will be in Japan and will take place during the day here.) on New Year’s Eve as usual. The Dynamite!! card will feature two DREAM title fights. The main event will be a rematch between current featherweight champ Bibiano Fernandes and Hiroyuki Takaya,who is coming off of back to back wins, followed by a bout between high-flying, limitlessly entertaining striker Marius Zaromskis and the Japanese legend Kazushi Sakuraba for the DREAM welterweight strap. Sakuraba, coming off two straight losses, is a strange pick for the title fight as I’d liked to have seen Jason Miller take on the Lithuanian but I suppose he is still hunting down Nick Diaz.  The card also boasts a “hybrid” K1/MMA bout between Shinya Aoki and Yuichiro Nagashima as well as fighters such as tough American Jason High vs former welterweight champ “Mach” Sakurai, the soon to be filthy-fuckin-rich Minowaman, and Caol Uno the, recently released, aging former UFC fighter looking to get his career back on track.

We’ll be back to action with American based promotions immediately though as the UFC 125: Edgar vs Maynard card is set for the next night, January 1st. The very next weekend Showtime will air Strikeforce Challengers 13 live from Nashville, TN on Friday the 7th. Then on January 22nd UFC Fight for the Troops 2 will go down at Fort Hood.

Sufficient explanation…

Posted: December 4, 2010 in america, life
Tags: , , , ,

Now that I have been made aware that the American Psychological Association has looked into it I don’t feel so bad about not writing sometimes. It’s a psychological issue. It’s not my fault. Sad to see that people were trying to make excuses for everything even way back in 1973, glad to see that even then people knew how to make fun of it.

I‘ve recently been giving a lot of thought to children training and competing in mixed martial arts (MMA). I’ve asked a few parents and insiders what their opinions are. Surprisingly many are for the training aspect of the different disciplines at a very early age but don’t want their children in the danger associated with the sport of MMA. I have even spoken with a few parents who feel that their children would be safer and ultimately better served, character wise, to train in martial arts than to pursue traditional contact sports like football or hockey. This is not meant to be a purely persuasive argument for children in MMA but more so as an informational source to help parents and society in general better understand the sport and its parts (Jiu-Jitsu, Wrestling, Boxing, Muay Thai, and Judo) before they demonize it.

(A shot from a youth class @ Dauntless Practical Martial Arts in DE.)

As with anything else relating to the rapidly expanding sport of MMA it has its pros, cons, and more than its share of detractors. More often than not these nay sayers are ignorant about the sport. They see the cage and the blood and their mind is made up. “Journalists” write articles like this piece on DailyLobo.com. I don’t write about fashion, figure skating, competitive cheer leading, ballroom dancing, ballet, or cervical cancer NOT only because all of them have nothing to do with American Manliness but mainly cause I don’t know a thing about it except that I don’t like it. Therefore I keep my lips firmly sealed. Some people are inclined to see MMA and take it at face value…

…these denouncers of all things violent only see the blood. They refuse to see the hard work, self discipline, and mutual respect involved in the sport. Most of them do not even know what MMA is. They know it as ultimate fighting or cage fighting, as it’s described in this horribly biased 2008 article from MSNBC NBC Sports. I’m not going to paint a sailboat on calm seas and tell you that MMA is the safest and best sport for people to participate in or that our children should or shouldn’t participate. I agree with some of the statements made in the aforementioned article, although no quote came with any context. Administrator of the Oklahoma Professional Boxing Commission, Joe Miller was quoted as saying,

“There’s too much potential for damage to growing joints,”

but there is no context and the quote used isn’t even a complete sentence. I agree that the danger to a child’s body is much greater than that of adults. I don’t think that there should be full contact bouts between 8 year olds but at the same time I do feel that training in the martial arts at such a young age helps to build character and a stern mindedness within our youth that is missing from our society today. The respect and self-confidence that is instilled through martial arts is a universal attribute that all kids need. Of course martial arts are not the only paths to having respectful and confident well mannered children, but it is an option. We, as Americans, have sent our children, myself included, to Karate and Tae Kwon Do classes at these ages for decades. I remember being 7 years old in Tae Kwon Do with full contact sparring. There were, of course, safety precautions taken such as head gear, mouth piece, shin and foot pads, and a padded flak jacket for rib and organ protection. If that was safe for me in 1992 then 18 years later what is the difference in allowing our children to do the same thing in other disciplines of martial arts?

In my home town of Memphis, TN there are multiple martial arts training facilities that offer youth classes. One of the more prominent gyms in the area offering a youth program is Memphis Judo & Jiu-Jitsu. The Judo/Jiu-Jitsu program they offer is for ages 5-12 both male and female. When I spoke with an instructor he described the classes as focused on technique and discipline while serving to keep the kids active and healthy as BJJ is a great exercise. The drills are converted into a game format that helps to keep the kids interested and motivated. The children are paired together by size to keep the activities both fair and safe. Advanced (dangerous) joint locks like Americanas, Heel Hooks, or Omoplatas nor strikes are taught with the kids to prevent injury to their under-developed skeletal structure.  Their site describes the classes as:

The Judo & Jiu-Jitsu student learns: focus, goal setting, goal achieving, dealing with aggression without over reacting, rolls, falls, throws, pins, escapes, positional control, ground grappling and more. Best of all, Judo and Jiu-Jitsu provides an opportunity for fun, fellowship, thinking and exercising–all at the same time!

There are other gyms that don’t institute the strikeless, free-form learning technique that Memphis Judo & Jiu-Jitsu, opting instead for a more direct training method. Gyms such as Mantis Boxing Factory in McAllen, TX, operated by Shifu Israel Flores, takes a graduated approach starting as young as 3 years old.  The 3 -5 year old classes are focused on improving motor skills such as balance and coordination while teaching “age appropriate self-defense”. The class also promotes life skills such as self-discipline, respect, and sharing. In the 6 – 13 classes the students begin to train in “complete self-defense” and  Mantis Boxing or “Ultimate Weapons training”. Next is a video of Shifu Flores presiding over a sparring match between a 7 and 8 year old students.

Even with all the padding and the trainer over watch is this too much? Similarly, is this video from a 2008 Pankration tournament show senseless violence or spirited competition?

So, again, I ask of you…Where are the lines when our children and MMA  cross? I have provided opinion and shared sources for training. If you are interested please contact your local gym and talk with the instructors. Maybe just sit in on a class and make a judgement for yourself. Maybe these ages are too young. There are high school MMA clubs. Would you allow your children to participate in that?